Thursday, February 27, 2014

Crotch Of Steel - The Video ( WARNING!! EXPLICIT CONTENT)

A short video made by me and some friends showing how much pain can a human body endure in one of the most sensitive parts of the body.


GUYS PLEASE DON'T TRY THIS AT HOME. YOU MAY HURT YOUR BALLS





video

Tuesday, February 11, 2014

Random Photos of India - WARNING: CONTENT GRAPHIC PHOTOS

Stuck in my 9 hours a day, 5 days a week job; I can’t stop browsing the pictures I proudly possess from the little travelling I have done over the few years. To me, the ultimate freedom lies in getting lost in a new city looking for that attraction mentioned in that blue travel guidebook that we all dearly hold on to but end up finding my real self, the smell and the sound of chaotic markets, the view after an eight hours hike, the joy in scoring a hotel room at a price much lower than the rates mentioned in that blue travel guide, all the people we meet and the stories they have to share, later bumping into them after a week in the most unexpected place, showers replaced by deo spray, the freedom of carrying our whole world in a backpack, to me that is freedom.

This post is dedicated to all those bitten by the travel bug yet stuck in a 9 hours a day, 5 days a week job.

WARNING: CONTENT GRAPHIC PHOTOS BUT NO NUDITY. FAINT-HEARTED MIGHT FIND SOME OF THE IMAGES DISGUSTING AND DISTURBING.


Kids posing for a picture in Himachal Pradesh

A pup checking out hikers in Uttarakhand


Tribals hunting monkeys for their flesh in the border area of Nagaland and Burma

Menu of a Restaurant in the India- Burma Border. Check out the Item 2 in the menu. 



Somewhere near Nagaland and Manipur, India

Tea with a View in Himachal Pradesh

The funniest name for a juice


Kids with their horns up in Rishikesh


In a busy street in New Delhi

Monday, January 27, 2014

The Untouched Bainital

Words are not enough to describe the view of the rolling green hills dotted with multi colored flowers and random sheep gazing that climb up to join the magnificent snow topped Himalaya Mountain Range from Bainital. 


View of Simli


View on the way to Bainital



Locals chilling and enjoying the warm sun


A seamlessly serene haven without even a pinch of the noise and the chaos of the big city, though it’s just some 15 hours away from the ever chaotic New Delhi, Bainital is among one of India’s best kept secrets. As I ride my behind off in the bumpy roads up to Bainital, falling in love with the simplicity of the people and the place, it made me realize more, how much we as a civilization with a hunger for modernity can change an entire geography and just how long can this untamed, untouched beauty of Bainital can escape the brutal hands of the tourism industry.


View of the Snow capped Himalayas 


My Ride to Bainital. The View was worth the sore ass



The Locals and their Laid-back life! Ohh! How I envy their life!


Endless open space yet not a single soul except the occasional bleating of sheep in the far distance, it’s a wonder how we live cramped in such small spaces in the city where there is so much open space right here.


View from Bainital







The perfect example of laidback




Firewoods for the chilly nights


Some Facts:

  • Bainital is located around an hour from simli
  • The settlement has only four houses
  • The Settlement brags a 98% literacy
  • Though remote and secluded yet Bainital is well connected by Tata sky, mobile phone networks.
  • Yes there is no settlement beyond Bainital
  • Unfortunately there is no hotels or any accommodation available, the nearest place to find a hotel is  Karanpryag, located around an hour from Simli and around two hours from here. 






Thursday, November 28, 2013

Undiscovered Simli, Uttarakhand - A photo Essay


Even an hour away from the chaotic New Delhi is a blessing and when you get to enjoy an entire weekend far away from the smelly, crowded and the chaotic Capital, it’s worth doing a twerk, though I would prefer a mamacita twerking rather than me.

Way to Simli


Numb butt! Totally worth the pain.

Travelling not just about visiting places with world famous monuments, it’s the opportunity we get to meet people from different cultures and experiencing new lifestyles. Most of the times we missed out the real purpose of travelling as we are too engage in exploring places that are too tourist refined. Thus, my journey to the ‘Land of the Gods’, and my romance with the Himalayas starts from Simli, a small settlement in the Indian state of Uttarakhand.


View from the road above

Pindar River

Pindar River - How I Envy those people with a house right on the river banks


The icy cold water of Pindar River


A slice of heaven for everyone looking for serenity, it’s really a wonder that a place as peaceful as Simli is located just 15 hours from the chaotic New Delhi and around 7 hours from Rishikesh. The trip is very tiring, but the first view of the mountains as you leave the plains behind and start your climb up, that’s when you realize, the numbness in my butt is worth.

View from the terrace


Looks like the hill is smoking up



Simli is a not even a town, it’s like a small settlement with not more than 75 houses with a population of around 400 to 500. It’s among one of the most secluded places in the country yet with all the amenities of the modern world. Unfortunately for most travelers, Simli is better treated as a day trip as the settlement does not have any sorts of hotels or guesthouse.



The magnificent view of the mountains from the terrace, the gushing sound of the icy cold river in the backyard of the house and the fresh air which I assume might even have healing power because of the purity; Simli just got listed in my top ten destinations in India.


View of Simli with the majestic mountains in the background


The most convenient way to reach Simli is by train from Delhi to Haridwar and from there you can catch a local bus. If you want to head straight from New Delhi, take a bus from Anand Vihar bus station. Since getting an accommodation in Simli is a big NO, try to book a hotel in Karanpryag, located around an hour from Simli. Karanpryag is the main market town for the area and the only place close enough to Simli where you can get a hotel.

  

Next stop - the untouched Bainital

Thursday, October 31, 2013

10 THINGS INDIA DOES BETTER THAN ANYWHERE ELSE

Nothing irritates me more than deleting those spam emails every single day. I really don’t want to Increase the size of my wiener with your no side effect miracle drugs, if there is really a way to earn $5000 everyday from home, why the hell are you doing trying to sell your video or maybe you have earned enough cash that you have all the time in the world to spam around. Mr. Nigerian Prince, am seriously not interested in sharing your wealth of some million $. Even if there are bored housewives near my house looking for a good time, am honestly not interested. I know how they look and most of their husbands must be facing a tough time trying to differentiate the boobs and the many stomach flips. But the Miracle drug for breast enhancement sounds kind of interesting, maybe I should get one for my girl. Overall, spam emails are just freaking irritating.
Anyway, coming to the point, recently someone I know shared this article and I thought you guys might want to read.

FYI: This article was written by Monisha Rajesh and I think its published somewhere here: visit www.cnnasiapacific.com


Trying to decode the many variations of the head bobble:

Figuring out what grammatically bizarre "Indianisms" actually mean. 
Marveling at how creamy, delicious kulfi manages to stay so cold in summer.
That's probably what the 7 million tourists to India wonder each year as they flock to the country of 1.2 billion people.
Just for them, here's a list of ways India outshines the rest of the world.

Image soure: http://funnyindianpicz.blogspot.in/2011_10_01_archive.html
1. Barbers

In India, a simple hair cut is anything but.
Barbers will take their scissors to wayward eyebrows, tufts of ear hair and nostrils.
That's just the beginning.

Once the customer is shorn, wet-wiped and toweled off, barbers begin a firm head, neck and shoulder massage, which can descend into facial slapping and skull-pounding known as "champi," which is where the word "shampoo" comes from.

Be warned: their signature move is a swift neck crack, which can come as a shock to first-timers.

2. Enterprising street vendors
India's street vendors sell the usual wares, from fake DVDs to earrings to bags of masala popcorn and roasted peanuts.

But there's also ear-cleaning, street dentistry and pavement astrology.

Vendors possessing the presence of mind to seize any opportunity -- last year when Starbucks opened in Mumbai, the queues were so long, a tea-vendor set up shop outside and sold his wares to waiting customers.


3. Old world train travel
This year marks 160 years since the birth of Indian Railways, which carries more than 20 million passengers a day along 65,000 kilometers of track.

Thundering through cities, inching past villages, snaking along coastlines and climbing mountains, the network of toy trains, luxury trains, Shatabdi speed trains and commuter trains is lovingly known as "the lifeline of a nation."

In terms of safety, however, there's still far to go, owing to the trains' decrepit state, unmanned crossings and lack of government attention.

Tip: travelers should choose the new derailment-proof Duronto trains -- there's no better way to see the country.

4. Notorious celebrities
Hollywood stars have nothing on Bollywood stars when it comes to entourages, paparazzi and fanatic followings.

They might endorse skin-lightening creams, produce terrible films and become embroiled in one scandal after another, but almost nothing can't dim their stardom.

Current fave Sunny Leone -- a former pediatric nurse trainee in Orange Country turned porn star and now mainstream actress -- is the most searched celebrity on the Internet, racking up 35 million searches in India this year.

5. Accessorizing
From Hyderabad pearls to Jaipuri gems, intricate Indian jewelry is coveted the world over, and local women are usually dripping in it.

In the markets in Rajasthan, maids sweep temples and Rabari tribeswomen in Gujarat effortlessly carry buckets, mop floors and balance heavy loads -- all while wearing five-inch diameter nose rings, toe-rings, glass bangles to the elbow and gold necklaces swinging by their bellies.

6. Comfort food
image Source http://www.fun2video.com/funny-indian-passenger/
From Mumbai's Mohammed Ali Road for kebabs to Amritsar's Lawrence Road for Makhan Fish, India's addictive food leaves no room for worries over waistlines.

Steaming chicken kathi rolls, crunchy sweet and sour bhel puri or creamy lassi from even the starkest of roadside shacks are bewilderingly tasty and satisfying.

7. Gesticulating
India has more than 800 dialects, but it's the head-shaking and wrist-flicking gestures that are the most dramatic means of communication and an inherent part of an Indian's genetic makeup.

In South India, pointing a thumb toward the mouth can mean anything from "what do you want?" to "have you eaten?"

To make matters more confusing, Indians will often shake their heads from right to left to signify that they are, in fact, following what you're saying and agreeing, rather than disagreeing.



8. Obsessing over cricket
When the British left India, they left two real legacies: the railways and cricket.

Not just the preserve of the upper classes wearing club ties, drinking Pimms and eating cucumber sandwiches, cricket in India is a way of life, enjoyed by every class, age and sex, while cricketers are revered as gods.

Watching a live Indian Premier League match is a night time floodlit spectacle featuring semi-clad cheerleaders, fog horns, fireworks in the crowds, drummers and, of course, with a brand value of just less than $3 billion, a lot of extravagantly rich cricket players.

9. Festivals
With so many religions and cultures existing side by side in India, it's rare for a week to go by without some sort of celebration.

Indians will normally extend invitations to anyone and everyone from next door neighbors to stray travelers who they may have met that morning on a train.

It's wise to bring along a change of clothes when invited to share mutton biryani during Eid or set off Lakshmi banger fireworks in the street at Diwali or be doused in colored water during Holi, the festival of spring.

  
10. Cities in the mountains
India's cities in the mountains, or "hill stations," are walkers' havens.

Less well known than other hill stations, Matheran is one of many we love.

Hidden between the jungle-topped Sahyadri hills 80 kilometers east of Mumbai, it was originally used by the British to escape the Bombay heat, and is free from fume-spewing vehicles while being accessible on horseback, on foot or by the narrow-gauge toy train that trundles along tiny tracks.

Recommended: picnicking on Charlotte Lake, lookouts at Celia Point and chikki (a sweet made from groundnuts and jaggery) at Nariman Chikki Mart.

Thursday, October 17, 2013

CNN Premiere of Anthony Bourdain Parts Unknown –Sicily

  


Finding the ‘Istituto Italiano di Cultura’ was quite a task, which I realized after reaching the venue that it was part of the Embassy of Italy and worse was it was just ten minutes walking distance from my house. I should be exploring more places around me.


If you love watching travel shows, it’s tough that you have never come across Anthony Bourdain. There are tons of travel shows which focuses on different cuisine of the world but what separates his show from the rest is his genuine love for food which is pretty evident from his lick clean plates and his willingness to taste everything no matter how adventurous it may be. His show does not only focus on the food, he also gives importance to the history of the place, the culture, plus the process involved in choosing and collecting the ingredients needed to cook that specific dish. Afterall, every dish has a story to tell. It’s not just about the food; the show will take you on a tour of the place.
  
The latest Anthony Bourdain Parts Unknown –Sicily will take you through the serpentine stone cobbled streets of Catania in Sicily to snorkeling amongst almost-frozen, dead octopuses, from chucking down some really delicious grilled horse meat to exploring the chaotic fish and meat market. The best was when they slaughter a pig, how they skin the pig, collected the blood in a bucket for the sausage and how the liver was cooked in olive oil and wine. This reminded me of my small lazy hometown, where every December, just a week before Christmas we would lay down a little piggy and the whole family would come over for lunch.

Following him along the gorgeous landscape of Sicily and watching him savoring delicious food, it’s really tough not to fantasize a vacation over there. What was tougher was, my brian was shooting images of the movie ‘The GodFather’, after all Vito Corleone and Michael Corleone did spend a good amount of time here in Sicily in the movie.

The Sicily edition is really entertaining, but I should warn you that the scene of the pig slaughter, blood and free conversation without filters might tick off the more uptight viewers. But who are we kidding! Honesty and straight to the point attitude are the trademarks that make Anthony Bourdain show unique from the lot.

You can catch all the exciting stories, adventures and the amazing cuisine every Friday at 19:30 IST on CNN International.

For more details visit: http://edition.cnn.com/video/shows/anthony-bourdain-parts-unknown


Did I mention that the spread over at the premiere was quite decent. The Cookies were yummy! 

P.s: The show ended very abrupt, I hope the guy handling the projector did not do anything stupid because the moment the projector went blank I looked at him and I saw this look that you give out only when you screw up something. Just a thought though!

Tuesday, October 1, 2013

In the World's Largest Democracy

The ideology of Democracy is great. The rich feel safe knowing that the government won’t snatch their wealth away, while it provides hope to the poor as it preaches equality for everyone projecting a ray of anticipation that they have a chance to climb the social ladder.

Communism is even greater than Democracy as it promises a classless, moneyless and stateless social structure. Though Communism might scare the rich while the poor rejoice at the thought of an equal social structure yet the 1.4 billion homeless Chinese and the 7 million undernourished North Koreans might not agree with the classless, moneyless and whatever ideology.

Democracy and communism are two completely different political ideology but with one aim, for the betterment of the people and the society. Maybe it might have worked out back then but somewhere down the line, something very terrible happened or else 70 million Indian won’t be homeless in a country which believes in the 'Government of the people, by the people, for the people'.

Equality in most cases is for the rich and the powerful. Especially when you live in a country like India, you realize that more often. In the world’s largest democracy, you can get away with most crime if you have enough to pay for it. When it comes to becoming a leader of the state, a criminal record can’t do a damn in the world’s largest democracy. Just some months ago, in a certain state in the North East region of the country, a certain cabinet minister was caught with illegal firearms, good enough to start a small militant group and cash large enough to feed the entire state for weeks. This happened just some days before the election. Though the minister had to spend the night in the police station but won the election and now he is a member of the cabinet. This is just one instance out of the thousands.

Article 14 of the Constitution reads: “The state shall not deny to any person equality before the law or the equal protection of the laws within the territory of India". I guess, in the world’s largest democracy, though the equality before the law is very strongly documented but it does not apply to the rich and the powerful. But what if it was you or me, would the state still treat us with the same leniency.

The World’s largest Democracy spend crores of Rupees to calm the internal chaos that is spreading, while some leaders blames foreign hand behind the countless of militant groups breeding in the country but can it be possible that it all started because the State failed to enforce the Articles 14, 15, 16, 17 and 18 of the Constitution of India.